Archive | Uncategorized

Every help is appreciated

A solo mother’s hope for her children

 

She admits that from the outside, especially when looking at their house, she does not look like needing any assistance. The house she lives in is her parents’ as she is living with them with her two children.

However, looking closely at her situation, 25-year-old Analyn Mendoza, a resident of Brgy. San Diego in Lian, Batangas Province, definitely needs help. At age 19, her live-in partner died due to heart attack and she is left with the care of their two children.

She only finished third year high school because of her early pregnancy. Therefore, she is not able to find a good job to support her children. She works as a part-time tutor and a barangay health worker and still provides for her stay-at-home father and her mother, whose income is derived from selling fish in the neighborhood from time to time.

Any amount of assistance matters

Early in August 2018, Analyn received PhP2,400 under the Unconditional Cash Transfer (UCT) program. Under the Tax Reform Acceleration and Inclusion (TRAIN) Law, qualified poor households will receive a cash subsidy from the national government amounting to PhP200 per month for the first year and PhP300 per month for the succeeding years (2019 and 2020).

The UCT aims to augment the daily needs of the poor households and individuals brought by the effects of the implementation of the TRAIN Law including the increase in prices of basic commodities.

Beneficiaries of the UCT include beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program, the Social Pension Program for Indigent Senior Citizens and identified poor households under the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s database of poor households based on the house-to-house assessment conducted under the Listahanan targeting system last 2015.

Analyn’s family belongs to the latter.

“Naalala ko dati, mayroong pumunta sa bahay namin, taga DSWD daw sila. Kinukuha ang mga detalye sa amin katulad ng sino ang mga kasama ko sa bahay at ano ang pinagkakakitaan namin. Hindi ko alam na may ganito pala kaming matatanggap,” recalled Analyn, who is referring to the house-to-house assessment of DSWD last 2015.

Further, she shared that another validator went to their house last April to update her data. This is the process conducted by the DSWD to validate all the poor households identified in the 2015 assessment for inclusion in the UCT beneficiaries.

“Kahit po maliit na halaga kung titingnan ‘yung P200 kada buwan, malaking tulong na po ito sa aming pamilya, lalong lalo na sa mga anak ko,” shared Analyn, who excitedly computes that the PhP200 per month can provide for the food and allowance of her children for two weeks or purchase a set of vitamins for the two of them.

The minimal amount will greatly augment her income of PhP800 per month as a barangay health worker and PhP50 per hour that she tutors children during examination periods.

 

Not losing hope

Despite their financial situation, Analyn is firm on her dreams for her two children, who are seven and 10 years old now—to ensure that they get a good education.

“Kaya patuloy po akong nagsusumikap para sa kanila. Plano ko rin pong makahanap ng scholarship para kahit papaano ay makapag-aral muli,” shared Analyn.

She is also hopeful that the government and other institutions will be able to help families like her in the future, especially now that their family is listed in the database of poor households of the DSWD. The DSWD uses the Listahanan database of poor households as basis in the selection of beneficiaries for social protection programs and advocates to local government units, national government agencies and non-government organizations to use the same for the targeting of beneficiaries for their respective programs for the poor.

“Dati po, nagtataka ako kung bakit hindi kami p’wedeng mag-apply sa 4Ps (Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program). Pero hindi pala kami kasama sa listahan ng mahihirap na pamilya na naging basehan ng pagpili ng mga benepisyaryo,” she said.

In the process of the Pantawid Pamilya program, beneficiaries are identified through the list of poor households under the Listahanan database during the 2009 assessment. Qualified households from this list or those with children zero to 14 years old or pregnant woman at that time were registered in the program.

“Noon po kasing unang survey, hindi pa po kami dito nakatira. Buhay pa rin po ang tatay ng mga anak ko kaya kahit papaano ay nasusuportahan namin sila,” shared Analyn, who added that she completely understands the process.

Right now, she knows she cannot rely on any program for her dreams for her children. She is determined to work hard to provide for her family. But she will greatly appreciate any assistance if this means she can better ensure the chances of reaching her dreams for her children.#

 

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on Every help is appreciated

Last man standing: A breadwinner’s story

It is difficult to work in an unfamiliar place, away from home but for Ramon Herrera, 43, no distance can hamper his desire to be a good provider for his family. As the eldest son and breadwinner of the family, he wanted to ensure a secured future for his parents and his siblings.

Ramon of Brgy. Panungyan II spent most of his life in Mendez, Cavite. In order earn and help his family, he farms various types vegetables and does extra construction jobs within their barangay.

“Noon po ay pa extra extra lang po ako sa labor (construction), taga-halo ng semento tapos sumasama lang po ako pag may nagpapagawa sa malapit. Madalas po ay nasa bukid po ako nagtatrabaho, nagtatanim ng sari-saring gulay”, he shared.

From these income-generating activities, he earns around PhP 3,000.00 monthly which is not enough to sustain the daily subsistence of his family. When he heard about Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP), he was determined to join and have a more stable job.

“Nalaman ko po na may ganitong programa para sa mga 4Ps, sinubukan ko po dahil sayang po ang oportunidad na iyon para po makapag-aral ng libre at mas makatulong sa amin”, he shared.

Having a little background on construction work, Ramon with 29 other participants courageously participated in the skills training on masonry (NC II) through the employment facilitation (EF) track of SLP. Under this track, participants are empowered and equipped with technical know-hows to be able to acquire compatible jobs.

They were trained and provided with starter kits by St. Peregrine Institute (SPI), a partner technical institution of SLP. Right after the training, out of 30 participants, 11 including Ramon were hired by D.M. Consunji, Inc. (DMCI), a construction company through the help of SPI.

“Talagang sipag at disiplina ang kailangan, hindi pwedeng malalate kase masususpinde. Kailangan po talaga na maging maayos sa pagtatrabaho”, he added.

Since 2017, Ramon works in DMCI projects in Manila. From roughly PhP 3,000 per month from farming and being a seasonal construction laborer, he is now earning around PhP 15,000.00 monthly.

Hardworking as an ant, he works for about 12 to 15 hours a day to earn more.

Alone but not giving up

At first, Ramon was hesitant to work far from home. Manila is quite far from Cavite so he needed to rent a small place near the construction site.

“Noong una, syempre po may kaunting alinlangan dahil iba’t iba po ang mga makakasama, ibang-iba ang buhay dun sa Maynila pero naging maganda naman po ang pakitungo sa akin ng aking mga kasamahan ko kaya naging madali lang po sa akin ang pag-aadjust”, he shared.

According to Philippines Institute of Development Studies (PIDS), one of the emerging problems in SLP particularly on EF participants is the distance between job opportunities and their residence. However, Ramon did not allow distance to obstruct him from achieving his goals.
“Umuuwi na lang po ako pag day-off ko. Kailangan po talagang magtiis kahit mahirap para mas malaki po ang naiiuuwi ko at mas maging maayos po ang buhay namin”, he proudly shared.

In less than a year, some of his co-participants left their jobs at DMCI. Out of eleven, he was the only one who continued working in the company.

“Yung iba ko pong kasamahan wala na po akong balita, hindi ko na po alam kung pinagpatuloy po nila ang pagcoconstruction. Para po sa akin, naging magandang pagkakataon po ito sa akin kaya kahit wala na po silang lahat, nilakasan ko po ang loob ko na magtrabaho”, he shared.

Construction work has a lot of workplace hazards. According to Ramon, one of his tasks is to cement and polish the outside of high-rise buildings which requires him to work 10 to 20 feet above the ground.

“Isa po kasi sa ginagawa ko ay ang magpalitada sa labas ng building. Mataas po ang mga ginagawa naming pero nakasanayan ko na lang po na nasa mataas na lugar kaya hindi na po ako natatakot”, he shared.

Because of the nature of his work, Ramon expressed how grateful he is to have PhilHealth. Aside from this, he also receives SSS and PAG-IBIG benefits from his employer.

“Dati wala akong hawak na pera pero sa ngayon nakakatulong ako kahit pakonti-konti, hindi ako tumatambay, may income na ako at kahit konti ngayon may ipon na naman din ako”, he gratefully shared.

Rebuilding their own abode

When he is finally earning enough, he started renovating their old house. Now, with his practical skills and construction tools; and with the help of some of their relatives, he was able to repair some parts of their house which was devastated by tropical storm Glenda in 2014.

“Paunti-unti po naming napaparenovate ang aming lumang bahay. Kahit paano sana hindi na po ito masisira ng bagyo. Magiging matibay po ito”, he gladly shared.

For Ramon, age is just a number. He expressed that he still sees himself working in the construction for five to ten years.

“Nakikita ko na mas tatagal pa ako sa trabaho kong ito at mas marami pa akong magiging experience na kung papalarin ay magagamit ko po sa pag-aabroad”, he hopefully shared.

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on Last man standing: A breadwinner’s story

Lian residents engage in masonry

A total of 450 residents of Lian, Batangas had been identified as recipients of a skills training on masonry under the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s Sustainable livelihood program (SLP).

The training, which will be conducted in partnership with the St Peregrine Institute, will enable participants acquire skills that would enable them to participate in local projects that are aimed to establish facilities in response to water, sanitation, and hygiene problems in the locality. The training also includes examination which would qualify them for a TESDA national certification II (NC II), and a provision of starter kits.

During the recent Yakap Bayan Community Mobilization and Support Program outreach activity in Brgy San Diego of this municipality, DSWD Assistant Secretary Anton Hernandez awarded ten starter kits to selected participants of the said training. Dir Annie E. Mendoza of DSWD Field Office IV-A and Rey Dante, training manager of St Peregrine Institute Training assisted Asst Sec Hernandez in the awarding of the starter kits which includes hammer, hard hat, handsaw, a pair of safety shoes, a pair gloves and vest.

Macario De Los Reyes, 43, of the participants of the said training and a recipient of the starter kit distributed expressed his gratitude for the training opportunity provided to him.

“Magagamit ko po ang aking matututunan para para makatalong po ako sa paggawa ng maayos na CR dito po sa amin. Inaasahan ko rin po na makakapagtrabaho po ako sa ibang lugar na nangangailangan ng CR,” he shared.

Community reintegration of drug surrenderees

Of the 450 recipients of the skills training on masonry, 60 residents of Brgy. San Diego. Of this number, 30 are drug surrenderees and 30 are beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program of the DSWD.

Dir. Mendoza emphasized that providing the poor and disadvantaged families, including drug surrenderees, with opportunities to improve the skills and knowledge is important crucial as this would enable them to become productive members of their respective families and communities.

“Ang training na aming binigay sa ilalam ng SLP ay isa lamang sa mga opportunidad na binigay  DSWD para mabigyan ng suporta ang mga mahihirap, kasama ang ilang indibidwal na nagkaroon ng problema sa illegal na droga.  Hinanahamon po namin ang lahat ng kasapi sa skills training na ito na pagbutihin ito upang kayo’y magkaroon o mapalago ang inyong kabuhayan at mabago ang inyong buhay,” she shared. 

The SLP is a capability-building program of the DSWD that provides suitable income generating opportunities to identified poor, vulnerable and marginalized program participants to help improve their socio-economic well-being through micro-enterprise development or employment facilitation. It is currently being implemented in all municipalities and cities nationwide to help its program participants have an improved quality of life.#

 

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on Lian residents engage in masonry

WHEN ALL HOPES DIE

A future teacher’s story of her rekindled hope for her dreams

 

All throughout her childhood, she thought that the lack of opportunities was her number one enemy. Never did she thought that her “full of positivity” self will turn out to be her greatest adversary.

“Sa lahat ng pinagdaanan ko, nawalan na ako ng pag-asa na makatuntong pa ng kolehiyo. Naisip ko na magtrabaho na lang kahit na ilang ulit akong pinaalalahanan ng Nanay ko na p’wede na akong makapag-aral nang libre,” shared Laysa Arasa, 21, a resident of Brgy. Burol in Majayjay, Laguna.

Laysa grew up in a family of nine. Getulio, her father, is a farmer while her mother, Salome, is a housemaid. Though Laysa relates that they eat thrice a day, she knew at a young age that they are challenged financially.

“Pumapasok kami sa school kahit walang baon. Minsan nagbabaon ng saging o kamote para hindi kami magutom sa school,” recalled Laysa, who was very determined to go to school at her young age. For a young Laysa, she has a concrete dream of going to college, getting a good job and taking her family out of their situation.

To achieve all these, Laysa decided to make her own move. However, she constantly struggled.

 

Working for her education

When she was in Grade 5, Laysa, who was 11 years old at that time, started working to earn for her school needs.

“Tuwing Sabado at Linggo, naglilinis ako ng bahay ng teacher ko para kumita. Binibigyan ako ng 100 pesos na pinagkakasya ko sa buong linggo na papasok ako,” she said.

During summer vacations, she also engaged in cleaning houses to earn for the next school year. What she earns, she uses to buy school supplies and other needs.

When she reached third year in high school, she decided to work as a stay-in house helper.

“Hindi madali na nangangatulong ka habang nag-aaral ka. Nalulungkot ako dahil hindi ako nakakauwi sa bahay namin pero kinailangan kong magtiis para makatulong ako sa pamilya ko at makatapos ako,” said Laysa.

This situation only fueled her desire to finish college. At that time, she promised herself that she’ll not be forever a house helper. However, when she graduated in high school, Laysa’s dream of a college education seemed to be still very far.

“Bumalik ako sa pangagamuhan dahil pinangako sa akin ng amo ko na pag-aaralin ako pagkatapos ng isang taon. Nagkaroon ako ng pag-asa,” shared Laysa.

Being 16, Laysa found it hard to deal with the challenges of a full-time work around the house as well as babysitting a small child.

“Noong panahon na ‘yun, malapit nang magpasukan pero hindi pa rin ako sinasabihan na mag-enroll kaya gumawa ako ng paraan para makaalis at makauwi sa amin dahil gustong gusto ko talagang mag-aral,” she said.

 

Ending her dreams

When she went back to Majayjay, Laysa decided to enroll in a vocational school. She used her savings to enroll; however, she did not finish the course because her savings ran out. Hence, she decided to work again.

“Sumuko na ako. Naisip ko na baka hindi talaga para sa akin ang pagtatapos ng pag-aaral dahil kahit ano namang gawin ko ay sa pagtatrabaho din naman ako bumabagsak,” she shared sadly.

She engaged from one job to another such as working in a bakery and a small pizza stall. She experienced working towards her limits such as not eating at the right time, working until late at night and getting not enough salary for all her hard work.

With all these, Laysa knew her dreams were over.

 

Renewed hope

Laysa’s family is a beneficiary of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development. As a family-beneficiary, Laysa became qualified to become a grantee of the Expanded Student Grants-in-Aid Program for Poverty Alleviation (ESGPPA) of the Commission on Higher Education.

The said program targets at least one member of a Pantawid Pamilya household-beneficiary to get a college degree. This enables poor families to have at least one college graduate who can have higher chances of getting better-paying jobs in the future and later on increase the family’s chances of getting out of poverty.

“Paulit-ulit akong kinakausap ni Nanay tungkol sa ESGPPA pero paulit-ulit din akong tumanggi. Alam ng nanay ko na pangarap ko talagang makapag-aral. Pero noong panahon na ‘yun, sumuko na talaga ako,” she shared.

In the end, Laysa accepted the opportunity. She enrolled in Laguna Polytechnic State University after passing the requirements of the university. She cannot be more thankful for the support on her college education, particularly her tuition and allowance for school projects.

She did not waste any of the opportunity that she was back in school. She focused on all her subjects, fueled by her all-time dream of graduating and getting a decent job.

This June, Laysa will be graduating with a degree in Secondary Education major in Physical Science. For this, she cannot hide her excitement.

“Yung pagtatapos ko, kalahati pa lang sa katuparan ng pangarap ko. Magtatrabaho pa ako at tutulungan ang pamilya ko na makaahon. Ipapaayos ko pa rin ang bahay namin na matagal na naming pangarap na pamilya,” she shared with pride.

After graduation, she plans to start working immediately. She’ll work her way supporting her family as well as saving enough to pay for her enrollment in a review center so she can take the licensure examination.

For everything that she went through, Laysa is very thankful to her mother who encouraged her when she has already given up on her dreams. She is also grateful to the opportunities that allowed her to be in school and get a college diploma.

But most of all, she is thankful and proud of herself. She has proven that she is indeed her own enemy, but she knows that she is also her own friend when it comes to dreaming and reaching it.# with reports from ARMakipagay

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on WHEN ALL HOPES DIE

A good change

It was payday. A smile was evident on Marissa Soliman’s face. Shopping – that was all she could think of. With all of the money that she earned from working in a spa, she would go to the nearest mall to buy the things she wanted.

After her shopping spree, she would go home not to cook for her children nor to check on them. She would go straight to a neighbor’s house who invited her to play tong-its or bingo.

“Nauubos po ang kita naming mag-asawa noon sa luho at pagsusugal. Nandiyan na rin po ang paggamit ng ipinagbabawal na gamot. Iyong mga bisyo na rin po namin ang naging rason ng paghihiwalay namin noon,” Marissa shared.

Their vices caused their frequent fights and misunderstandings. In early 2010, her husband left them and went to Bicol. Marissa had to work alone to support the needs of their children. She even thought that her family would never be complete again.

Breaking the bad habit

It was in the same year when Marissa became a member of the Pantawid Pamilya. She recalled that during one of the Family Development Sessions (FDS), their City Link emphasized the importance of the family. Marissa then realized that it was not too late for her to make things right.

She worked on leaving her vices behind and started focusing on her children instead. She also started sending her husband messages sharing how her day in the FDS went and what her learnings were.

“Hindi na po sumasagot si Mario sa text ko kaya hindi ko na po inasahang uuwi pa siya. Hangga’t isang araw, bumalik siya dito sa bahay namin sa Dasmariñas. Wala na siyang bisyo. Naghanap po ulit siya ng trabaho. Nagsimula po kami ulit. Uma-attend na rin siya ng FDS kasama ang mga anak namin. Nabago po kaming lahat ng Pantawid. Naayos nito ang pagsasama naming pamilya”, Marissa recalled.

Working their way out of poverty

Apart from the changes that the program brought to Marissa’s family, the cash grant that they are receiving has been helping their children with their educational and health needs. She could not even forget how her Pantawid ID saved them from a dilemma when she gave birth to her youngest child.

“Wala po kaming ni piso na binayaran sa PhP130,000.00 na bill namin noong manganak po ako sa aking bunso. Laking pasalamat po namin sa Diyos, sa Pantawid at sa PhilHealth dahil hindi po talaga namin alam kung saan namin kukuhain ang pambayad sa hospital”, said Marissa.

The support that they are receiving from the program motivates Marissa and Mario to work even harder for their three children. In fact, the couple are planning to open a sari-sari store at home. With their faith and hardwork, they are sure that they would be able to make their way out of poverty.

“Nagpapasalamat po talaga ako sa Pantawid dahil kung hindi po kayo dumating sa buhay namin, baka hanggang ngayon ay nagsusugal pa rin kami o baka hanggang ngayon ay hindi pa rin buo ang aming pamilya”, Marissa said with her eyes full of positivity.

 

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on A good change

A father’s hammering success

Behind every infrastructure are workers who sweat it out day in and day out just to ensure that these structures are completed and safe. Noel Ecinas is one of such workers

Noel, 49, lives in Brgy. Castanos Lejos, General Emilio Aguinaldo, Cavite.  He has four children but only earns Php2,500 monthly a construction worker.  It is not enough and he felt he needs to earn more for his family. But unfortunately, he does not have the required certification for construction workers. Thus, he decided to try his luck in another line work. In 2015, he began working as a security guard earning Php9,000 monthly.

Going back to his expertise

But for Noel, construction work is his first love. He is confident in doing such works as he knows the nitty-gritty of it. Thus, when there was an opportunity to return to this kind of work, he made sure he did not miss it.

“Noong nalaman ko po na magkakaroon ng training sa TESDA, hindi po talaga ako nagdalawang-isip na sumali dahil gusto ko pong magkaroon ng certificate at makapagtrabaho nang maayos,” he said.  

For 21 days, Noel and 13 other participants were trained in masonry and carpentry at St. Peregrine Institute (SPI) in Bacoor, Cavite, a partner institution of the DSWD under the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP). Their training includes exams that would earn them a certification from the Technical Education and Skills and Development Authority (TESDA) for the said skills trainings.

“Masaya po kasi nakatapos po ako ng mga kursso. Meron po kami kahit paano ng pagkakataon na mabigyan ng mas maayos na hanap-buhay”, he happily shared.

Aside from his years of experience and skills, Noel now has two national certificates, the weapons he could use find a better job.

Fearless father in a risky job

In less than a week after the graduation, Noel was hired as a mason by the Danilo D. Tamayo Konstract, Inc. (DDTKI), a partner construction company of SPI.

Since June 2017, he is working on building a condominium in Mall of Asia Complex, Pasay City.

“Kumpara sa mga dati ko pong trabaho, napakalaking kaluwagan po nito sa aming pamilya. Pwede pa pong mag-OT pag gugustuhin kaya mas malaki po talaga ang sinesweldo ko dito,” he proudly shared.

Noel works extra hours to earn more for his family. Every month, he earns P 10,000 to P20,000, almost 8 times more than his previous salary as an seasonal construction worker in Cavite.

Aside from his salary, Noel now also enjoys having benefits such as Philhealth, SSS PAG-IBIG and 13-month pay, which he never had in many years of being a laborer.

“Mahalaga po sa akin ang benefits na aking natatanggap para po prepared po ako sa aking retirement,” he shared.

Reaping his sacrifices

Working far from home, Noel admits that he misses his family. But his desire to provide for his family pushes him to persevere and work hard in order to achieve what he and his wife aspire that is to prepare their children for their own future.

“Hindi ko hinahangad na magbigay sila ng pera o suportahan nila kami. Ang nais lang po naming mag-asawa ay mapaghandaan nila ang sarili nilang mga buhay, he said.

For now, Noel is slowly seeing the fruits of his sacrifices. His eldest child is now a college graduate and is already working.  He looks forward to the completion of studies of his other children.

As a participant of SLP, he also challenges participants like him to value the opportunity given to them by the program and its partner institutions.

“Kung hindi po magpupursige, mawawalan po ng halaga ang binigay na tulong. Hindi lahat nabibigyan ng pagkakataon na matulungan na magkaroon ng maayos na trabaho kaya hanggang kaya ko pa po, magtatrabaho po ako bilang construction worker”, he firmly stated. with reports from JTeaño

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on A father’s hammering success

WHEN ALL HOPES DIE

A future teacher’s story of her rekindled hope for her dreams

All throughout her childhood, she thought that the lack of opportunities was her number one enemy. Never did she thought that her “full of positivity” self will turn out to be her greatest adversary.

“Sa lahat ng pinagdaanan ko, nawalan na ako ng pag-asa na makatuntong pa ng kolehiyo. Naisip ko na magtrabaho na lang kahit na ilang ulit akong pinaalalahanan ng Nanay ko na p’wede na akong makapag-aral nang libre,” shared Laysa Arasa, 21, a resident of Brgy. Burol in Majayjay, Laguna.

Laysa grew up in a family of nine. Getulio, her father, is a farmer while her mother, Salome, is a housemaid. Though Laysa relates that they eat thrice a day, she knew at a young age that they are challenged financially.

“Pumapasok kami sa school kahit walang baon. Minsan nagbabaon ng saging o kamote para hindi kami magutom sa school,” recalled Laysa, who was very determined to go to school at her young age. For a young Laysa, she has a concrete dream of going to college, getting a good job and taking her family out of their situation.

To achieve all these, Laysa decided to make her own move. However, she constantly struggled.

Working for her education

When she was in Grade 5, Laysa, who was 11 years old at that time, started working to earn for her school needs.

“Tuwing Sabado at Linggo, naglilinis ako ng bahay ng teacher ko para kumita. Binibigyan ako ng 100 pesos na pinagkakasya ko sa buong linggo na papasok ako,” she said.

During summer vacations, she also engaged in cleaning houses to earn for the next school year. What she earns, she uses to buy school supplies and other needs.

When she reached third year in high school, she decided to work as a stay-in house helper.

“Hindi madali na nangangatulong ka habang nag-aaral ka. Nalulungkot ako dahil hindi ako nakakauwi sa bahay namin pero kinailangan kong magtiis para makatulong ako sa pamilya ko at makatapos ako,” said Laysa.

This situation only fueled her desire to finish college. At that time, she promised herself that she’ll not be forever a house helper. However, when she graduated in high school, Laysa’s dream of a college education seemed to be still very far.

“Bumalik ako sa pangagamuhan dahil pinangako sa akin ng amo ko na pag-aaralin ako pagkatapos ng isang taon. Nagkaroon ako ng pag-asa,” shared Laysa.

Being 16, Laysa found it hard to deal with the challenges of a full-time work around the house as well as babysitting a small child.

“Noong panahon na ‘yun, malapit nang magpasukan pero hindi pa rin ako sinasabihan na mag-enroll kaya gumawa ako ng paraan para makaalis at makauwi sa amin dahil gustong gusto ko talagang mag-aral,” she said.

Ending her dreams

When she went back to Majayjay, Laysa decided to enroll in a vocational school. She used her savings to enroll; however, she did not finish the course because her savings ran out. Hence, she decided to work again.

“Sumuko na ako. Naisip ko na baka hindi talaga para sa akin ang pagtatapos ng pag-aaral dahil kahit ano namang gawin ko ay sa pagtatrabaho din naman ako bumabagsak,” she shared sadly.

She engaged from one job to another such as working in a bakery and a small pizza stall. She experienced working towards her limits such as not eating at the right time, working until late at night and getting not enough salary for all her hard work.

With all these, Laysa knew her dreams were over.

Renewed hope

Laysa’s family is a beneficiary of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development. As a family-beneficiary, Laysa became qualified to become a grantee of the Expanded Student Grants-in-Aid Program for Poverty Alleviation (ESGPPA) of the Commission on Higher Education.

The said program targets at least one member of a Pantawid Pamilya household-beneficiary to get a college degree. This enables poor families to have at least one college graduate who can have higher chances of getting better-paying jobs in the future and later on increase the family’s chances of getting out of poverty.

“Paulit-ulit akong kinakausap ni Nanay tungkol sa ESGPPA pero paulit-ulit din akong tumanggi. Alam ng nanay ko na pangarap ko talagang makapag-aral. Pero noong panahon na ‘yun, sumuko na talaga ako,” she shared.

In the end, Laysa accepted the opportunity. She enrolled in Laguna Polytechnic State University after passing the requirements of the university. She cannot be more thankful for the support on her college education, particularly her tuition and allowance for school projects.

She did not waste any of the opportunity that she was back in school. She focused on all her subjects, fueled by her all-time dream of graduating and getting a decent job.

This June, Laysa will be graduating with a degree in Secondary Education major in Physical Science. For this, she cannot hide her excitement.

“Yung pagtatapos ko, kalahati pa lang sa katuparan ng pangarap ko. Magtatrabaho pa ako at tutulungan ang pamilya ko na makaahon. Ipapaayos ko pa rin ang bahay namin na matagal na naming pangarap na pamilya,” she shared with pride.

After graduation, she plans to start working immediately. She’ll work her way supporting her family as well as saving enough to pay for her enrollment in a review center so she can take the licensure examination.

For everything that she went through, Laysa is very thankful to her mother who encouraged her when she has already given up on her dreams. She is also grateful to the opportunities that allowed her to be in school and get a college diploma.

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on WHEN ALL HOPES DIE

DSWD joins CALABARZON RDC Community Outreach in Sariaya

Students from three public elementary schools in Sariaya, Quezon received personal items and school supplies from various government agencies who participated in a Community Outreach Program recently conducted by the CALABARZON Regional Development Council (RDC).

A total of 998 students from Castañas, Guis-Guis San Roque and Lutgarda Causapin elementary schools received the gifts from the Council. This includes slippers, underwear, food packs, school and hygiene supplies. Medical and dental services were also provided by the Department of Health and the Armed Forces of the Philippines Southern Luzon Command (SOLCOM) and a free haircut provided by the Philippine National Police (PNP).

The Council Vice Chairman and National Economic and Development Agency (NEDA) Regional Dir. Luis G. Banua shared that the outreach program is a way for NGAs to reach out and improve their delivery of goods and services to communities in the region.

“Ito ay panimula lamang. Kung may mga pangangailangan pa na kayang maihatid sa mga komunidad tulad dito ay tulong-tulong po naming aayusin at aaksyunan,” Dir Banua said during his message during the activity

Aside from providing gifts and services to the students from the said schools, the outreach program also aims to mitigate insurgency situations in the locality and nearby communities. The community outreach is also part of the Yakap Bayan: Community Mobilization Support Program which aims to strengthen the community and its members against lawlessness and criminality through providing sustainable system of rehabilitation and after care to drug surrenderees.

The Department of Social Welfare and Development Assistant Secretary for Special Concerns Jose Antonio Hernandez, in his message, emphasized that the gifts and services being provided aim to help students to be focused and perform better at school, and not be affected by the absence of basic necessities.

“Ang mga ganitong gawain ng mga ahensya at organisasyon ay para sa kinabukasan ninyong mga bata. Nasa sa inyo ang pag-asa ng Sariaya,” Assec Hernandez stressed.

The Regional Development Council is a regional organization comprised of local government units, national government agencies (NGAs), non-government organizations and other development partners working together for an integrated implementation of different programs and services of government agencies to achieve a holistic development in the region.***

Posted in UncategorizedComments Off on DSWD joins CALABARZON RDC Community Outreach in Sariaya

DSWD FO4A @ Twitter

Archives

Related Sites

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